The Sorting: Flash Cards & Games for Student Groups

I was discussing strategies for assigning students to group with a friend the other day. We were in Target’s Dollar Spot. When I said I used flash cards, she gave me a quick quizzical look. I explained my strategy and told her that she may find it helpful, because she’s starting at a new school. When you know your students well it is much easier to assign them to groups. When you don’t know your students as well, then you need some random student generators.

Flashcards and card games are a great help!

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Last year I used a set of Arthur cards all year. They are number cards with three cards per set. One numerical representation, one visual representation (dots), and one written word. When the three cards are put together correctly they make a picture on the back. I used the cards to put students in groups or to decide who got to use the Smart Table first during centers.

This set is great, but I want some steps that will easily divide students into pairs or into larger groups. Here’s what we found at Target.

These Frozen cards can either help you divide students into pairs (each card has a match) or into groups of four (there are six repeated colors in the set). If you start with groups of four (maybe a table group) then students can break off into pairs for specific tasks.

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These Finding Nemo cards and the Crayola dino cards are identical sets of four, which is great for dividing students into groups of 3 or 4. Keep an eye on the last few cards you’re passing out and be sure you only have one of each number left, rather than two (leaving a group of just 2). The numbered cards are great if you need to rotate through stations. I usually say something like, “Twos! It’s your turn at the SMART Table!” Once students walk over for their turn, they leave their card in a little basket and then I reset the time. This helps me keep the crowd over there at a minimum. It’s a new resource and very popular. The dino cards would be more difficult to use in this way.

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I saved my favorite for last! I love these Dr. Seuss cards because there are two wild cards! If you have an odd number of students and need just ONE group of three, then you can throw a wild card into the deck. The student with the wild card can choose his/her group.

When I saw these and then opened the rest, I thought the wild idea might work for some of the other sets, if you don’t have any groups where you’ll need all the cards. You can easily designate one design as the wild card.

I’m planning to laminate all of my new cards. It will be a bit of work to get them run through and then cut out, but my Arthur cards are really well worn. Even though these cards look good to go, once they’ve been handled once or twice by an entire grade level they start to get grimy quickly.

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